Existential Google-Angst

I posted a blog over at Landscape Surgery yesterday about the challenges of getting indexed by Google without actually logging into Google:

“…resisting the charmingly convenient yet data hungry ministrations of the googlebots is proving an existential challenge. I can’t ‘submit my URL’ to Google, or use any analytical or webmaster tools without creating an account, and as result of this, the google spiders are steadfastly refusing to crawl in my direction.”

loginScreenshot 2015-06-13 12.57.30As of yesterday, searches for ‘Linguistic Geographies’ had returned references to a 2010 AHRC project which analysed the writing on the medieval Gough Map, the “earliest map to show Britain in a geographically-recognizable form”. The Gough Map is still online in searchable format, but the project itself finished in 2011. Other search results refer to the Journal of Linguistic Geography, which specialises in “dialect geography and the spatial distribution of language relative to questions of variation and change”. I can see how my research might interact with these subjects – which are primarily in the field of Linguistics, rather than Geography – further down the line, but my own brand of Linguistic Geographies will be looking at what you might call the ‘cyber-spatial distribution of language’.

photo copyBut yesterday was a long time ago on the internet, and as of this morning there is a new entry to the (bottom of the) first page of Google search results for ‘Linguistic Geographies’. As I suspected might happen, however, it is as a result of yesterday’s Landscape Surgery blog, and not my own site. Although the Right to be Forgotten and other cases involving Google have reminded us that ‘Google is not the Internet’, it is how over 90% of the UK population access online information. To all intents and purposes, https://linguisticgeography.wordpress.com/, still does not ‘exist’…

UPDATE 15/06/2015: Disappeared again! Even the Landscape Surgery blog which references Linguistic Geographies has disappeared from the search results.

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One thought on “Existential Google-Angst

  1. Pingback: Existential Google-Angst UPDATE! | Linguistic Geographies

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